About CELSI

Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI) is a non-profit research institute based in Bratislava, Slovakia. It fosters multidisciplinary research about the functioning of labour markets and institutions, work and organizations, business and society, and ethnicity and migration in the economic, social, and political life of modern societies.

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Martin Kahanec appointed a member of Expert Panel of the Council for Research, Development and Innovation

Martin Kahanec appointed a member of Expert Panel of the Council for Research, Development and Innovation

Martin Kahanec has been appointed a member of Expert Panel of the Council for Research, Development and Innovation, a Czech governmental body for the evaluation of research output in Social Sciences.

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Press release "Immigration Policy: Why states should look out, and not in"

A new study published by the Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI) suggests that the policies of foreign governments may overshadow domestic policies in determining levels of immigration, and that policymakers should consider carefully the choice of destinations available to potential immigrants.

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CELSI/ETUI conference in Brussels: Europe at a crossroads. Which way to quality jobs and prosperity?

CELSI/ETUI conference in Brussels: Europe at a crossroads. Which way to quality jobs and prosperity?

CELSI joins forces with ETUI and other prominent organizations to organize a conference on "Europe at a crossroads. Which way to quality jobs and prosperity?" to be held on September 24 - 26, in Brussels, Belgium.

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Press release "New research gives alternative perspective on Poland during the crisis"

A new study published by the Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI) lifts the veil on the hidden impact of the crisis on Poland's labour market. It reveals that while Poland was the only EU country not to enter recession, its effects on the Polish workforce have been severe.

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CELSI research fellow Pieter Vanhuysse published his latest Policy Brief "‘Workers’ Worries and Labor Market Policies"

CELSI research fellow  Pieter Vanhuysse published his latest Policy Brief "‘Workers’ Worries and Labor Market Policies"

Pieter Vanhuysse published his latest Policy Brief on union behaviour.

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Roma integration in European labor markets

Roma integration in European labor markets

Roma integration in European labor markets, IZA World of Labor

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Martin Kahanec talks at IZA/RAND Workshop "Mapping Diasporas in the European Union and the US" in Brussels

Martin Kahanec talks at IZA/RAND Workshop "Mapping Diasporas in the European Union and the US" in Brussels

Martin Kahanec presented as an invited panelist at IZA/RAND Workshop: Mapping Diasporas in the European Union and the United States jointly organized by IZA, RAND and the European Commission in Brussels on June 3, 2014.

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Tlačová správa "Desať rokov voľného pohybu osôb v EÚ – čo nám priniesol a kto na ňom získal?"

Prvého mája si pripomíname 10. výročie vstupu Slovenska do EÚ, ktorý viedol k postupnému napĺňaniu práva voľného pohybu občanov SR za prácou v rámci jednotného trhu EÚ. Slovensko po rozšírení patrilo medzi krajiny s vysokou mierou migrácie za prácou – výrazne vyššou ako susedné Česko. Nová štúdia Stredoeurópskeho inštitútu pre výskum práce (CELSI) ukazuje kto a prečo zo Slovenska migroval a hodnotí dopady migrácie na trh práce.

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Martin Kahanec and labour economists from 10 EU countries sign "Working Without Borders: A Manifesto for Europe's Future"

Martin Kahanec and labour economists from 10 EU countries sign "Working Without Borders: A Manifesto for Europe's Future"

Labor economists from 10 EU countries sign "Working Without Borders: A Manifesto for Europe's Future"

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Press release "Young migrants from new EU member states: Why they want to leave, and do they want to come back?"

Young singles and young fathers in new member states are especially inclined to leave their homelands, but they also intend to come back sooner than other people, according to a new study published by the Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).

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